Retirement Plan Considerations at Different Stages of Life

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Retirement Plan Considerations at Different Stages of Life

Throughout your career, retirement planning will likely be one of the most important components of your overall financial plan. Whether you have just graduated and taken your first job, are starting a family, or are enjoying your peak earning years, your employer-sponsored retirement plan can play a key role in your financial strategies.

Just starting out
If you are a young adult just starting your first job, chances are you face a number of different challenges. College loans, rent, and car payments are competing for your entry-level paycheck. The decades ahead of you can be your greatest advantage for your retirement fund. Through the power of compounding, you can put time to work for you. Compounding happens when your plan contribution dollars earn returns that are then reinvested back into your account, earning returns themselves. Time offers an additional benefit--the potential to withstand stronger short-term losses in order to pursue higher long-term gains. That means you may be able to invest more aggressively.

Getting married and starting a family
You will likely face even more obligations when you marry and start a family. Mortgage payments, higher grocery and gas bills, child-care, family vacations, college savings contributions, and home repairs and maintenance all compete for your money. Although it can be tempting to cut your retirement savings plan contributions to make ends meet, do your best to resist temptation and stay diligent. Your retirement needs to be a high priority. While you're still approximately 20 to 30 years away from retirement, you have decades to ride out market swings. That means you may still be able to invest relatively aggressively in your plan.

Reaching your peak earning years
The latter stage of your career can bring a wide variety of challenges and opportunities. Older children typically come with bigger expenses. You may find yourself having to take time off unexpectedly to care for aging parents. On the other hand you could be reaping the benefits of the highest salary you've ever earned. With more income at your disposal, now may be an ideal time to increase your contributions. If you're age 50 or older, you may be able to take advantage of catch-up contributions, which allow you to contribute up to $24,000 to your employer-sponsored plan in 2016, versus a maximum of $18,000 for most everyone else.   Investment and insurance products are: not FDIC insured; not guaranteed; and, may be subject to investment risk, including possible loss of principal.

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